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Shopping – simple rule:
When you buy products low-processed without additions, you avoid eating such substances as glucose-fructose syrup, artificial flavours, carrageenan, stabilizers, thickeners, palm oil, preservatives.

Bláthach Info

Soy sauce is a condiment made from a fermented paste of boiled soybeans, roasted grain, brine, and Aspergillus oryzae or Aspergillus sojae molds. Soy sauce in its current form have begun about 2000 years ago in Western Han dynasty of ancient China and spread throughout East and Southeast Asia where it is used in cooking and as a condiment.
Soy sauce is made either by fermentation or by hydrolysis. Some commercial sauces have both fermented and chemical sauces.

Historically, the mixture was fermented naturally in large urns and under the sun, which was believed to contribute extra flavours. Today, the mixture is placed in a temperature and humidity controlled incubation chamber.
Flavour, colour, and aroma developments during production are attributed to non-enzymatic Maillard browning.

Variation is usually achieved as the result of different methods and durations of fermentation, different ratios of water, salt, and fermented soy, or through the addition of other ingredients.
Soy sauce does not contain the level of isoflavones associated with other soy products such as tofu or edamame. It can also be very salty, having a salt content between 14–18%. Low-sodium soy sauces are made, but it is difficult to make soy sauce without using some quantity of salt as an antimicrobial agent.

Most varieties of soy sauce contain wheat, to which some people have a medical intolerance. However, some naturally brewed soy sauces made with wheat may be tolerated by people with a specific intolerance to gluten because gluten is not detectable in the finished product. Japanese tamari soy sauce is traditionally wheat-free, and some tamari available commercially today is wheat- and gluten-free.

Source: inter alia Wikipedia

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