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Shopping – simple rule:
When you buy products low-processed without additions, you avoid eating such substances as glucose-fructose syrup, artificial flavours, carrageenan, stabilizers, thickeners, palm oil, preservatives.

Bláthach Info

E412 – Guar gum, also called guaran, is a galactomannan. It is primarily the ground endosperm of guar beans. The guar seeds are dehusked, milled and screened to obtain the guar gum. It is typically produced as a free-flowing, off-white powder.
Guar gum is more soluble than locust bean gum and is a better stabilizer, as it has more galactose branch points. Unlike locust bean gum, it is not self-gelling.
Guar gum is economical because it has almost eight times the water-thickening potency of cornstarch – only a very small quantity is needed for producing sufficient viscosity.
Guar gum is a hydrocolloid, which is particularly useful for making thick pastes without forming a gel, and for keeping water bound in a sauce or emulsion. Guar gum can be used for thickening cold and hot liquids, to make hot gels, light foams and as an emulsion stabilizer. Guar gum can be used for cottage cheeses, curds, yogurt, sauces, soups and frozen desserts. Guar gum is also a good source of fiber with 80% soluble dietary fiber on a dry weight basis.
In the human digestive system the gum can function as a laxative by forming a bulky gel that moves the contents of the intestines along. For this reason, doctors will sometimes prescribe the stuff to alleviate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome or Crohn’s disease. Another benefit: guar gum is also one example of soluble fiber, which decreases the body’s levels of LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol.
In the smaller quantities of use in food guar gum is more healthy than problematic, although rare allergies to the substance do occur. Still, for most consumers, guar gum is a safe food additive.

Source: inter alia Wikipedia
See also what WHO say

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